Amplified, Episode 2: Yenn Purkis

Amplified, Episode 2: Yenn Purkis

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

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In the second episode Ginny Grant interviews Yenn Purkis, who is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books.

) )
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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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This podcast is funded by the National Disability Insurance Agency.

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Array ( [blockName] => core/shortcode [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/shortcode [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
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Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
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Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
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Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
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Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
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Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
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Hello and welcome to our second episode of Amplified: Autistics in Conversation with Reframing Autism.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

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I am so pleased to be chatting today with the wonderful Yenn Purkis. Yenn is an Autistic and non-binary advocate, presenter, and author and co-author of 10 books. Yenn has been a trailblazer in Autistic self-advocacy, with their work in this area beginning in 2005. They are truly prolific, producing memes, blogs, videos, and undertaking many speaking engagements, including a TEDx Canberra talk in 2013. Yenn has won several prestigious community leadership awards over the years, including the winner of an Achievement in Inclusion award at the 2019 ACT Chief Minister’s Inclusion Awards and also ACT Volunteer of the Year in 2016.

) )
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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

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On a personal note, I’ve been following Yenn’s work since 2015 when Autism came on my radar for the first time as a parent. I've seen Yenn present – in fact, at one of Reframing Autism’s early workshops at Plumtree – and like everything that Yenn does, their presentations are just full of warmth and colour and tremendous insight into Autistic experience. As a parent, I can recommend their series of books, ‘The Parents’ Practical Guide to Resilience for Children on the Autism Spectrum’, co-authored with Emma Goodall, and also their ‘Awesome Autistic Go-to Guide’, co-authored with Tanya Masterman.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

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For those of you who are new to this podcast series, Reframing Autism is an Australian-based, not-for-profit organisation which is run by and for Autistic people and their families and allies. It is dedicated to creating a world in which the Autistic community is supported to achieve acceptance, inclusion and active citizenship.

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

) )
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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Yenn: I … I'm one of the first Autistic people diagnosed in Australia in … when the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual came out with Asperger’s in it, so I was diagnosed in 1994. Bit of a long story – I do have a book about it called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’, which is my autobiography – but I was actually a prisoner when I was diagnosed. Very long story, as I say, if you're interested, grab the book. And my parents, my Mum worked with somebody who had a son who had just been diagnosed with this Asperger’s thing, and they got talking, and my Mum said, ‘Gee, that sounds like my child, Yenn.’ And so, they arranged … my parents arranged for a psychologist to come and do the assessment. I've actually been in touch with that psychologist, Dr Vicki Bitsika, and I've been in touch with her since, and she said it was quite challenging going into a prison to do an assessment, but that's what happened. I got my assessment done and came out. I got the diagnosis of what was called Asperger's, and I did not accept it for a number of reasons. I had a number of reasons that I did not want this to be me. I did not immediately find my tribe. I did not find it liberating or anything like that. I thought it was justification for the bullies at school and what they said to me – and it was … actually must mean they’re right, because they called me a nerd and all these things, and my understanding of Autism was very limited, and I thought it was a diagnosis of nerd and I didn't really want it. Deep down, I knew I was Autistic, the whole way. So, it took me seven years to come to terms and to accept my diagnosis, but really the whole time I knew it was correct, but it was just very raw and very personal for me, and I didn't want it to be correct, so it was quite a complex sort of thing. But I did accept that diagnosis when I was about … ooh, gosh, I don't know 25–26 and that was the beginning of my journey, I guess, of my life now. And I've learned a lot since 1994, and I've learned a lot about my Autistic identity and actually finding that, that strength and that pride in who I am, but it was quite a journey. And so, I do sometimes in my advocacy work come across people that aren't very comfortable with their diagnosis and don't really want it to be the case and I have a lot of empathy for those people ’cause that was me too. You wouldn’t think it now, but yeah …

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Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

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Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

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Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

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Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

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Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

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Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

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Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

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Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: That's just … it's so interesting, and, of course, it is so different now as someone who was diagnosed only last year. It's a whole other thing now. So that's just fascinating. Can you just say again the title of your book, Yenn, in case anyone missed it?

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

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Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Yenn: It's called ‘Finding a Different Kind of Normal’.

) )
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Array ( [blockName] => [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] => [innerContent] => Array ( [0] => ) )
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Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

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Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

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Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

) )
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Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

) )
Array ( [blockName] => core/paragraph [attrs] => Array ( ) [innerBlocks] => Array ( ) [innerHTML] =>

Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

[innerContent] => Array ( [0] =>

Ginny: Thanks. So how did your interest in Autistic self- and systemic advocacy develop?

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

) )
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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.’ And that is so true – has been true for me anyway.

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Yenn: That was also a bit of a journey, actually. So, I wrote my autobiography in 2005, and so that sort of put me into that space of advocacy and I became an Autism advocate almost by default, but it wasn't really my passion. So I did a few conferences, a few things like that, but not really anything very passionate and sort of quite like my interest in advocacy now. My interest in advocacy, that I've had for the past, sort of almost – it's almost 10 years – has been related to actually meeting an autistic young person who was very disabled – not by his Autism but by everyone's attitudes around his Autism – and this young man had finished school in Year Nine, and never engaged with education again. He’d spent six years of his life since he finished school, sitting in his room playing computer games and he was not happy with his life. And when I met him, I said, I was Autistic and at that point had written one book and worked for the public service, and he goes, ‘You’re lying. That's not possible,’ and just that conversation made me realise I needed to do something about empowering Autistic people – particularly Autistic young people and kids – to be able to embrace their life, as Autistic people, and to be proud of who they were, rather than being told they couldn't do anything, and that, you know, they might as well give up now. And that really spurred me into action, and that was in 2012, and since then, my advocacy work has just taken off. Actually, just before I logged into this conversation, I was updating my master spreadsheet, my master CV which has everything I've done in the Autism and mental health advocacy areas in the past 20 years, and that CV is 28 pages. I've really done a lot of things since then and it is my passion, and an Autistic person's passions will take them a long way. I was talking to someone – I can't remember in what context – but I was talking to someone the other day, and they said, ‘Oh yes, once an Autistic person finds their passion, they change the world.